K-12 STEM Outreach: A New HOPE(S)

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Developing instructional STEM curricula for deaf students. Using sports to teach STEM concepts to high schoolers. Organizing a C.S.I.-themed research project for 5th graders. The eclectic range of projects being undertaken by this year’s batch of awardees from the ASBMB Hands-on Opportunities to Promote Engagement with Science (HOPES) seed grant program showcases the myriad creative approaches to improve STEM education for K-12 students across the country. In 2015, the seed grant program received 27 applications, of which a total of nine were ultimately funded. To read more about this year’s HOPES recipients, click here.

Now in its fifth year, the goal of the HOPES program, which offers grants of up to $2000 for STEM partnerships between academic researchers and K-12 teachers, is to foster the development of sustained, mutually beneficial outreach partnerships that will enable educators and community leaders to leverage the resources and expertise of scientists from local colleges, universities, and industry as a means for engaging students and members of the public in active, stimulating, and informative STEM experiential learning activities, regardless of their background or level of experience.

This year saw the introduction of two new twists to the HOPES program. Awardees are now able to apply for a second year of funding from ASBMB, in order to help ensure the sustainability of their project. One of the main drawbacks pointed out by previous recipients was that, while the funds provided by HOPES were great for setting up a pilot project, ensuring that this project continued on in subsequent years was difficult without guaranteed funding support. Tacking on a second year to the award will help alleviate this issue by providing a short yet significant level of sustainability, thus allowing for buy-in from other potential stakeholders such as local companies and private foundations, or even school systems.

A second twist was holding the annual HOPES workshop outside of the confines of its traditional home within the Experimental Biology (EB) meeting, in order to increase the geographic diversity of HOPES participants beyond San Diego and Boston, which have between them hosted the past four EB meetings. This year, HOPES PI Regina Stevens-Truss led the interactive workshop, in which attendees hear from previous HOPES grant recipients and get a chance to network with potential partners, during the ASBMB Transforming Undergraduate Education in Molecular Life Sciences special symposium, held at Missouri Western University in St. Joseph, MO.

Moving forward, the HOPES committee (Dr. Stevens-Truss, Dr. Peter Kennelly [Virginia Tech] and Dr. Ray Sweet [Janssen Pharmaceuticals, retired]) aims to expand the reach of the HOPES program by presenting the workshop in a diverse set of geographic locations and venues, including  meetings such as those for the National Science Teachers Association and National Association of Biology Teachers. The committee is also collaborating with a professional evaluator to assess the efficacy of the programs supported by the seeds grants, as well as the HOPES program overall. Moreover, the committee is constructing a public interactive network of former recipients, current awardees and potential applicants that will provide a platform for sharing of information, ideas, resources and opportunities. Currently included on this website are project descriptions and activity manuals that can be used by anyone to help enhance the STEM experience for their students.

As a model for improving the K-12 STEM educational experience, five years of the HOPES program has proven an unqualified success. The next five years promise even more.

Click here to see data from the past five years of the HOPES program

 

Undergraduate Outreach- Round Two

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This past spring, the ASBMB Public Outreach Committee initiated a grant program for chapters of the society’s Undergraduate Affiliates Network, providing resources and funding up to $500 to help support science outreach activities. Due to overwhelming demand, we opened the program up for a second round of applications this fall.

Following an extensive application and review process, we are now pleased to report that two additional UAN chapters have been approved for funding from this program:

  • The University of Arizona chapter will use funds from ASBMB to help support BlastOff!, an annual science camp that provides a “free, hands-on opportunity to experience the thrill of being engaged in scientific exploration through field trips, experiments that they conduct themselves with the guidance of our Chapter members serving as mentors, and analyzing data.”
  • The University of Texas, San Marcos chapter will engage in both a STEM Outreach Field Trip to local elementary schools, and a Science Camp week on campus, both of which will introduce students to hands-on science activities.

It is especially heartening to see that the undergraduate members of the individual UAN chapters are the ones responsible for the organization and execution of the various outreach activities. Whatever they may lack in experience they more than make up for with their dedication, energy and passion that will guarantee the success of their local outreach efforts.

These awards bring the total number of UAN chapters funded through the POC-UAN Grant Program in 2014 to nine. You can learn about the activities from all of these chapters during our Science Outreach and UAN Activity Poster Session at EB2015 on March 28 at the Boston Convention and Events Center.

If your UAN chapter is interested in applying for this award, we will be accepting applications next spring. Stay tuned for the announcement!

Read more about the program here.

An Update on ASBMB Seed Grant Recipients

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In 2013, ASBMB instituted an Outreach Seed Grant Program, intended to “help fund novel, innovative science outreach programs that require modest financial support in order to get up and running.” Six different individuals received awards of up to $2000 annually, for a period of three years.

One year later, the recipients have reported back to us on the progress they made over the previous year, describing the events and activities that they sponsored and showing how their programs have encouraged greater participation with science within their local communities. Below are brief summaries of each of their programs:

Bob Ekman (Rockville Science Center):

The Rockville Science Center used ASBMB funding to build upon their existing science café program. Working with the city of Rockville (MD), the Center founded a monthly café event at the Rockville Senior Center specifically for senior citizens. In addition, the Center collaborated with students from the Universities at Shady Grove and Montgomery College to develop a young adult science café, targeted towards local high school students.

Teresa Evans (University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio):

Dr. Evans used ASBMB funds to found Teen Meetings Outside the Box (Teen MOB), a young adult-focused spin-off of the high successful Trainee Meetings Outside the Box mentoring/outreach program at UTHSCSA. In collaboration with the San Antonio Voelcker Biosciences Teacher Academy, TeenMOB was able to sponsor Science Night, a graduate student-run interactive event that featured booths highlighting various health and science-related topics for local high school students and their families.

Kelly Hallstrom and Ana Maldonado (University of Massachusetts, Worcester):

Science Cafe Woo organizers at Touch TomorrowScience Café Woo, a science café program founded in 2013, used funding from ASBMB to greatly expand their programming. In addition to increasing the attendance at their monthly science café series held at EcoTarium, the local science museum, organizers Kelly Hallstrom and Ana Maldonado were able to develop a number of science exhibits that showcased science for the greater Worcester (MA) community. These included the Science + You exhibition at EcoTarium and Worcester Polytechnic Institute’s annual Touch Tomorrow event. Further events are planned for 2015, starting with “You’re the Expert,” a science-themed comedy podcast.

Edwin Li (St. Joseph’s University):

Science on the Hill flyerDr. Li used funding from ASBMB to institute “Science on the Hill,” a science café series in West Philadelphia. The program hosted four events in 2014, covering topics such as climate change and microbial infections. 2015 will see an expansion in the size and scope of the program.

 

Lisa Scheifele (Loyala University):

Funds from ASBMB sponsored ten memberships to the Baltimore Underground Science Space (BUGSS), a community laboratory open to members of the public. The new members were then able to participate in both a public lecture from Dr. John Glass of the J. Craig Venter institute, and the “Build-A-Gene” course, a “hands-on course to create your own synthetic DNA” taught by Dr. Scheifele.

Garner Soltes (Princeton University):

Working with the Princeton Graduate Molbio Outreach Program, Mr. Soltes was able to use ASBMB funding to institute a number of events, including a science pub quiz and tasting tours that focused on the science of brewing coffee and beer. ASBMB-sponsored activities at public events, such as the Princeton Harvest & Music Festival, had the added benefit of including participants not just from the greater Princeton area, but also from as far away as Philadelphia.

ASBMB is proud to be a sponsor of all of these programs, and looks forward to their continued development in future years.

The Public Outreach Committee is currently looking to build upon this success by further developing the ASBMB outreach network through additional events and funding opportunities. Take a look at our website to see how you can get involved!

ASBMB UAN Chapters Awarded Funds to do Outreach

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To paraphrase, former Speaker of the House Tip O’Neill, all outreach is local. In that vein, the ASBMB Public Outreach Committee has undertaken a number of initiatives to promote and organize science outreach activities in local communities across the country.

The most recent venture was a novel partnership with the ASBMB Undergraduate Affiliates Network, a chapter-based consortium of over 90 institutions. Participation in science outreach is a requirement for individual UAN chapters, so the partnership was a natural fit. But to really spice the pot, the Public Outreach Committee worked with the UAN to develop a grant program that would allow individual chapters to apply for up to $500 to facilitate student participation in outreach activities.

Ultimately, chapters at seven schools were approved for funding this year. Some are continuing programming that they have been part of previously, while some are starting programs anew:

  • HENDRIX COLLEGE: Will bring student presentations and biology tutoring sessions to underserved students at Wonderview High School.
  • THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA: Will conduct molecular biology experiments alongside students from Tampa Preparatory High School. (Chapter link)
  • THE UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO: Will use amino acid builder kits to teach fundamental concepts in biochemistry to local middle school students from underserved communities.

While this program is only one part of a broader effort to involve ASBMB members in science outreach, the dedication and passion of our undergraduate members are encouraging indicators for success. Even better, participation in these activities will instill an interest in outreach that will (hopefully) endure throughout their careers, wherever they end up.

Read more about the program here.

The Guerilla in the Room

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This month’s issue of ASBMB Today features a column about Guerilla Science, a unique organization that brings science to diverse audiences by mixing STEM topics with art and culture. Back in October, ASBMB helped co-sponsor the collective’s most recent event, the “Enlightenment Party,” a scientifically-themed costume party that brought the 17th century to life for San Francisco residents. Students from the ASBMB Undergraduate Affiliates Network chapter at San Francisco State University, along with faculty advisor Teaster Baird Jr., were front and center as cast members running the Plague game, during which party attendees were surreptitiously infected with “plague” (actually UV ink), before being diagnosed and “cured” by the scientists. Check out pictures from the event here.

SFSU UAN chapter- Enlightenment party

Dr. Baird reflects on his chapter’s participation in the winter edition of the ASBMB UAN newsletter Enzymatic. Click here to read: Enlightenment Party review by Teaster Baird Jr.

Can’t get enough? Here’s a link to even MORE pictures from the event (you can see the ASBMB crew in photos 330-346): http://www.flickr.com/photos/rocketqueen/sets/72157636774349534/

Read the column in ASBMB Today: http://www.asbmb.org/asbmbtoday/201401/EnlightenmentParty/

Announcing the 2014 Outreach Seed Grant Winners!

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Our main goal on the ASBMB Public Outreach Committee is to get ASBMB members involved with public outreach activities. As a first (admittedly big) step in that direction, this month, the first round of awards from our Outreach Seed Grant Program were handed out. Individuals were able to apply for up to $2000 annually for three years to help fund novel or nascent science outreach programs needing modest financial support in order to get up and running.

From a highly competitive pool, 6 winners were selected:

Robert Ekman (Rockville Science Center)

Community Partnerships for Science Outreach through an Expanded Undergraduate Affiliate Network of the ASBMB

Bob EkmanThe Rockville (MD) Science Center, where Ekman serves as President, will partner with student members of the ASBMB Undergraduate Affiliates Network chapter at the Universities at Shady Grove to expand upon an ongoing science café series that targets local high school students. The group will also found a new café series at the local Senior Center to bring science to elderly local residents.

Teresa Evans (University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio)

Teen Meetings Outside the Box (TeenMOB)

Teresa EvansBuilding off an existing mentorship/outreach program developed by Evans, Trainee Meetings Outside the Box (TMOB), TeenMOB will work to develop a young adult science café in the San Antonio community. High school student members of TeenMOB will help organize local events for their classmates, relying on mentorship and advice from graduate student members of TMOB.

Edwin Li (St. Joseph’s University)

Science on the Hill

Edwin Li (new)Li will partner with Wynnefield Overbrook Revitalization Corporation, a community-centered non-profit based in West Philadelphia, to start “Science on the Hill,” a science café series that will expand local outreach efforts beyond those currently focused on downtown Philadelphia.

Ana Maldonado and Kelly Hallstrom (University of Massachusetts Medical School)

Science Café Woo

Kelly Hallstrom and Ana MaldonadoScience Café Woo, a science café program recently started by Maldonado and Hallstrom in Worcester, MA, will expand its outreach programming by hosting a number of public science events in conjunction with local science institutions, along with a science communication contest for local college students.

Lisa Scheifele (Loyola University Maryland)

Development of a Sustainable Synthetic Biology Workshop and Public Lecture at a Community Laboratory

Lisa ScheifeleScheifele will work with Baltimore UnderGround Science Space (BUGSS), a public synthetic biology laboratory, to increase participation by members of the local community in the “Build-a-Gene” workshop that she teaches. BUGSS will also host a public lecture series on both the applications and ethics of synthetic biology to help engage an even wider audience.

Garner Soltes (Princeton University)

Science by the Cup & A Tall Drink of Science: A Science Café Outreach Series in Central NJ and the Regional Northeast

Garner SoltesSoltes will work with the Princeton University Graduate Molecular Biology Outreach Program to start a science café in central New Jersey, gradually expanding throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. Students will serve as organizers, speakers and participants to bring science directly to local community members.

Besides all being strong, creative proposals, these programs also shared a common theme of aiming to deliver science to a particular community audience through a targeted approach. As much as we would like to bring science to everyone everywhere all at once, experience has shown that outreach is best done in a direct, focused manner.

Even more encouraging, proposals were submitted by ASBMB members from all different career stages, ranging from undergraduates to senior faculty. We hope that our awardees serve as inspiration for the greater ASBMB community to similarly get involved with outreach. No matter your level of experience, you too can help spread science in your community!

We are excited to help these programs flourish and watch them grow. Congratulations to all the winners!

For more information about the Outreach Seed Grant program, visit our website www.asbmb.org/publicoutreach.